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Comments for: Bright Are the Stars Upon the Margin of the World

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5 Comments

 
 

Bright Are the Stars Upon the Margin of the World

maeglin - 23 May 09 - 5:55 PM

General Comment

Kenaz, this is a great story!  Your Beleg "rings true" :)  One question, though, which I'm sure you've considered.  What about Cuthal (Beleg's father; hence Beleg Cuthalion)?  Not a criticism - it's very hard to write of the Elves before the Summons.

 Thanks,

Maeglin 

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Bright Are the Stars Upon the Margin of the World

Neaththetrees - 25 May 09 - 5:10 PM

General Comment

I don't want to impose: but I thought Cuthalion was to be interpreted "steadfast hound of the hunt", as opposed to "Son of Cuthal"... I suppose we can only guess, if what I've been taught it true, what Beleg's father's name might have been.

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Bright Are the Stars Upon the Margin of the World

maeglin - 25 May 09 - 5:47 PM

General Comment

Ah, could very well be.  Usually "ion" means "son of", but I guess "thalion" is a compound word meaning "steadfast"?  As in Hurin Thalion?  Anyway, I wasn't being serious, sorry if it came across that way.

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Bright Are the Stars Upon the Margin of the World

kenaz - 26 May 09 - 8:52 AM

General Comment

Hey there!

For what it's worth, my "vision" (such as it is/was) for Beleg's history in this particular piece was cobbled together from references I found in "The Lay of the Children of Hurin" and "The Lays of Beleriand."

In the Lay of the Children of Hurin, Beleg is referred to as "A son of the wilderness who wist no sire," which I translated as meaning Beleg 'knew no father.' Oshun wrote very convincingly about this particular tidbit in her character bio of Beleg on the Silmarillion Writers Guild. (http://www.silmarillionwritersguild.org/reference/characterofthemonth/beleg.php)

Later, in the "Lays of Beleriand," Beleg says of himself, "I am the hunter Beleg of the hidden people; the forest is my father and the fells my home." He may merely have been speaking in a poetic sense, but since it confirmed the 'fatherless' reference in CoH, I ran with it.

I certainly make no claim whatsoever that my interpretation is the correct one-- and with such a courageous character as Beleg, I rather enjoy the air of mystery clinging to his origins-- but I felt there was enough textual support in canon to justify my choice to write him as one of the Primordial Elves. 

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Bright Are the Stars Upon the Margin of the World

Aiwendiel - 07 Jan 10 - 2:29 PM

Ch. 1: Bright Are the Stars Upon the Margin of the World

Brilliant! Lyrical and portentious, full of wonderful imagery and a truly worthy depiction of a mysterious time and a fascinating character. Thank you for exploring this for us readers.

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