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2 Comments

 
 

Full of Wisdom and Perfect in Beauty

Aganaphel - 05 Mar 07 - 1:29 PM

Ch. 3: A Controversial Wedding

Very interesting chapter, Maeve.

Nice characterization. Actually I like your Gimilzor - somehow he came out as very likeable, clever, hard working guy, bearing all the burden of kinship instead of his half-crazy father. Great scene with Lady Zarhil - she is also bound to be one of my favorites. Inzilbeth is too young yet to be anymore than a victim, it seems. But she will grow up...

Great introduction into Your Numenor. One thing you must be dead right about is that Andunie monopoly for trade with Elves must have made them very rich. Understandably this implication is missing from the Akkalabeth...(written by Elendil)

I like your explanation of Gimilzor's reasons for changing his attitude toward the Faithful and even marrying one of them. There might have been an additional reason, though, and that was that by this time the life-span of the Kings has become sufficiently shorter than that of the Lords of Andunie (see this article by Alcuin: http://www.zarkanya.net/Tolkien/Decline%20of%20the%20Numenoreans.htm) - so brides coming from this line could be sought after to improve the Royal line in this respect.

There are some things, though, that puzzle me a bit. It seems that you make "Westernesse" a synonym for "Andunie". I may be wrong, but I have always thought that "Westernesse" was another name for Numenor as a whole.

You made Ar-Adunakhôr a bastard... Sure I understand that there should have been some reason for him to turn against the Eldar and the Faithful of Andunie so drastically as he did. You provided a good reason and an interesting "gap-filling" story. But yet, I don't think the proud Numenoreans would have accepted a bastard as King. The problem is that he was not just a bastard but a bastard of a serving maid. The Numenoreans were always opposed to lowly marriages and later generations of Kings always married within the Line of Elros. It was not only for pride, but to prevent the life-span of the children to become even shorter. In Arnor and Gondor they also stuck to the same rules (remember all this scandal about Eldacar?). So, I think that Ar-Adunakhôr had at least to be a son of a noble lady to be accepted. Or maybe Ar-Abattârik could divorce and remarry - the second marriage being never accepted by the Faithful?

Please, don't think I criticize you - I only share my thoughts on the subject. I love your story. Please, keep updating!

Cheers, Aganaphel

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Full of Wisdom and Perfect in Beauty

Maeve Riannon - 05 Mar 07 - 2:42 PM

Ch. 3: A Controversial Wedding

 Hi, Aganaphel- , my, thanks for the long, thought-out review!

 I like your explanation of Gimilzor's reasons for changing his attitude toward the Faithful and even marrying one of them. There might have been an additional reason, though, and that was that by this time the life-span of the Kings has become sufficiently shorter than that of the Lords of Andunie (see this article by Alcuin: http://www.zarkanya.net/Tolkien/Decline%20of%20the%20Numenoreans.htm) - so brides coming from this line could be sought after to improve the Royal line in this respect.

Oh, I REALLY wish I had been aware of this before. My Gimilzôr is a rather paranoid man, and no matter how I bribed him, he still refused to marry Inzilbêth for a very, very long time. Even after I found a reason of sorts, he´s still quite grumpy about it. Rolling my eyes

Still, in my universe the kings (and above all *this* king) find "Elvish" blood more a cause for fear and disgust than envy, so this interpretation probably wouldn´t have worked anyway. One of the points I´m trying to make is that there are many things that later seemed obvious for the people who read the Akallabêth (that Númenor was given as a reward for the allies of the Elves by the Valar, that they turned away from the Elves later and that this was the origin of their decadence, that their lifespan had disminished because they clung to life, that their customs had once been very different, that they lived that much because they had the blood of the Halfelven) which were largely ignored by the late Númenoreans, who lived the cultural heritage of Ar-Adunakhôr.

There are some things, though, that puzzle me a bit. It seems that you make "Westernesse" a synonym for "Andunie". I may be wrong, but I have always thought that "Westernesse" was another name for Numenor as a whole.

Ooops. Thanks for pointing this out. I was so convinced that I didn´t even bother to check it. Embarassed

Sure I understand that there should have been some reason for him to turn against the Eldar and the Faithful of Andunie so drastically as he did. You provided a good reason and an interesting "gap-filling" story. But yet, I don't think the proud Numenoreans would have accepted a bastard as King. The problem is that he was not just a bastard but a bastard of a serving maid.

Uhm- well, "my" late Númenor, as it will become evident later on, is a hierarchised "despotic" monarchy of a centralised nature (like, say, that of ancient Egypt, or Japan and China). A result of this is (as the future Tar-Palantír will have the chance to highlight quite grumpily in a much later chapter) that the people who serve the Kings and their families in their palace are not serving maids or overall lowly people, but nobles whose position in the household of the Kings is their greatest honour. In the Númenorean council, composed by 13 members, 4 of them are Palace courtiers.

This means that the mother of Ar-Adunakhôr, though nothing is said about her in this story, was probably a quite important person. If she had been a lowly serving maid, she would never have gained access to Ar-Abattarik.

And, in any case: my intention was to show the scenario for the average Major Commotion. Something that caused the first Númenorean civil war and a radical change in culture, politics and, as it will be seen later, religion. In some ancient societies, there is a known pattern according to which ambitious men who climb to a position that was not theirs by birth are those who give "populistic" turns to their society and introduce the important reforms that are later seen as "social conquests", "modernisation" or "the abolition of ancient customs" (depending of POVs, particular circumstances and times), which originally had the sole purpose of strenghtening their power and usually weakening the aristocracy. For me, Ar-Adunakhôr was this ambitious man, and he re-founded the line of the Kings (which is mostly known as the Line of Ar-Adunakhôr afterwards), as well as re-organised the kingdom. And I could not deny that Ar-Abattarik was his father, but this plotline demanded that I made his claims to the Sceptre less than obvious.

I´m glad you´re liking this story. With such a knowledgeable audience I´m feeling quite anxious now about my updates! *hides*

(take this as a compliment -just in case. Smile)

Maeve

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