Leithian Script: Act IV: 48. Scene V.ii

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48. Scene V.ii

A Boy, A Girl & A Dog
The Lay of Leithian Dramatic Script Project
BELOVED FOOL: BEYOND THE WESTERN SEA
SCENE V.ii



[Elsewhere: the Shadowy Stair. Beren (looking very ghostly and indefinite here) slowly ascends the shallow steps with an earnest, determined look, looking always forward, not up or around. The stars reflect in the polished material of the staircase perfectly still, not moving as with vibration the way reflections in water on even a stone step would tremble, although they flicker as in the night sky. There is a richness and intensity to the darkness, so that it does not look flat-black, but rather as if it were composed of an infinite number of layers of blue.]

[It is with a dawning surprise that the traveller realizes that he has come to the topmost stair, and stands on a flat terrace of indefinite dimension, like a still lake in a midsummer midnight. He looks around, slowly, frowning at the vertical lines that angle up from the periphery, faint glistening threads with rainbow gleams as the camera moves, like the embodiment of abstract geometrical concepts. ]

[Then he looks up, and his jaw drops as we follow to see the Constellations, writ huge and throbbing overhead, the Swordsman with his jewelled scabbard, the Butterfly, the Western Eagle, and in the center of them all, -- the Sickle, while the oldest stars pulse more faintly all around them, as if it were a desert sky with no moon.]

Beren: [gasping, completely without irony]
--Ah…Lady!

[there is a momentary shift, as if the universe somehow were shaken -- but it is not Ea which changes, only the focus of the beholder (camera), so that the far-off stars are suddenly revealed to be very near at hand, burning ornaments on a vault of blue-black enamel -- or else of transparent crystal, so flawless that the Road of Stars shines through without reflection; there is no way for the eye to be sure. ]

[The incomprehensible edges are facets of the prism-pillars which uphold the dome, the flat top of the ascent the floor of the Hall, the darkness all around not simply emptiness, but Space, defined and contained in ways almost beyond perception, so that one would have to walk carefully touching the edges to be sure what was support and what was between. Everywhere that there is light there is a faint rainbow effect, so that the sense is of white light that holds all colors within it, not white-and-black devoid of color, against the midnight-blue of the outer atmosphere.]

Beren:
I…

[his voice fades into silence as he struggles to make sense of it -- it should be both a far simpler, more primitive vision of Infinity than anything in 2001: A Space Odyssey, and also more beautiful, and mind-boggling. The Hope Diamond, stared into for long silent minutes, is the feeling that the production artists should capture -- not glass, but darkness and light made liquid and cast into solid form, clear and cold and perfectly blue in the shadows, iridescent in the highlights.]

[There is a sudden flash of white like a magnesium flare overhead, mirrored in the floor -- a comet? meteor? or soundless lightning? -- and he turns to follow its path across the dome, and freezes. The bolt of light rushes towards the farther side of the plateau, and comes to a stop in mid-air -- caught there, so it seems, until we realize that there are two figures there as well, seated on prismatic thrones, like an Egyptian statue of the God-King and Living Goddess carved not from basalt or alabaster but from living crystal, but in the Art-Nouveau Egyptienne style of Alphonse Mucha.]

[Note: Most of the special effects budget should be blown on the Taniquetil animation -- it has to be good, so that things are just alien enough to cause a momentary lag in comprehension, without leaving the viewer at a loss for what's happening.]

[ The white lightning, still scintillating in place, like burning metal, has come to fasten on the King's wrist -- in its angular pyrotechnic glare there should still be some discernable abstraction of sentience, of pointed intent, directed at its Lord.]

[as Beren stands there speechless, the living fireball twists and takes off again, returning as it came, and he turns involuntarily to follow its flight-path -- it passes through the dome-perimeter somehow, whether through an invisible window, or otherwise, and as it intersects the star-space it unfolds what are definitely widening wing-shapes, still made at this point of white light and glittering sparks before vanishing below the horizon-level of the hall. ]

[The Mortal shade turns back, still mute with awe at witnessing an Eagle in its native environment, to see that the Starqueen and her Consort have risen in greeting. (Though CGI, voices and original acting should be provided for the sovereign Valar by two of the great classic performers of the silver screen, Madeleine Carroll (Princess Flavia, The Prisoner of Zenda) and Frederic March (Jean Valjean, Les Miserables).]

[simultaneous]
Varda:
Manwe:
Welcome, --brother.

to be continued...

This is a work of fan fiction, written because the author has an abiding love for the works of J R R Tolkien. The characters, settings, places, and languages used in this work are the property of the Tolkien Estate, Tolkien Enterprises, and possibly New Line Cinema, except for certain original characters who belong to the author of the said work. The author will not receive any money or other remuneration for presenting the work on this archive site. The work is the intellectual property of the author, is available solely for the enjoyment of Henneth Annûn Story Archive readers, and may not be copied or redistributed by any means without the explicit written consent of the author.

Story Information

Author: Philosopher At Large

Status: General

Completion: Work in Progress

Era: 1st Age

Genre: Drama

Rating: General

Last Updated: 08/11/03

Original Post: 12/24/02

Go to Leithian Script: Act IV overview

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