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Things of Middle-earth

Aeglos (weapon)

Type: Weapons

Meaning: icicle, snow-point, snowthorn

Other Names:
spear of Gil-galad
Aiglos (LoTR editions prior to 2005 only)

Description:

A spear, the famed weapon belonging to Gil-galad:
Against Aeglos the spear of Gil-galad none could stand....

The Silmarillion, Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age

'I was at the Battle of Dagorlad before the Black Gate of Mordor, where we had the mastery: for the Spear of Gil-galad and the Sword of Elendil, Aeglos 1 and Narsil, none could withstand.'

The Fellowship of the Ring, LoTR Book 2, Ch 2, The Council of Elrond

His sword was long, his lance was keen,
his shining helm afar was seen....

From The Fall of Gil-galad
The Fellowship of the Ring, LoTR Book 1, Ch 11, A Knife in the Dark


Attested Meanings
Aeglos [Icicle], Spear of Gil-galad.

The Return of the King, LoTR, Index

Aeglos 'Snow-point', the spear of Gil-galad.

The Silmarillion, Index of Names

aeglos (1) 'Snowthorn', a plant that grew on Amon Rûdh....

Aeglos (2) The spear of Gil-galad (as a word-formation the same as the preceding).

Unfinished Tales, Index


Etymology
In this context, the element Aeg- appears to mean 'sharp':

...Aegnor (Aikanáro 'Sharp Flame' or 'Fell Fire')....

From nar- 'fire'; see Sammath Naur for the complete etymology.
The Silmarillion, Appendix: Elements in Quenya and Sindarin Names

AYAK- sharp, pointed. Q aika sharp, aikale a peak; N oeg sharp, pointed, piercing, oegas (=Q aikasse) mountain peak. Cf. N Oeges engrin Peaks of Iron, oeglir range of mountain peaks.

The Lost Road and Other Writings, HoME Vol 5, Part 3, The Etymologies

los 'snow' in Oiolossë (Quenya oio 'ever' and losse 'snow, snow-white'); Sindarin loss in Amon Uilos and Aeglos.

The Silmarillion, Appendix: Elements in Quenya and Sindarin Names


Notes
1In editions prior to 2005 'Aeglos' read 'Aiglos'. Tolkien comments in The Rivers and Beacon-hills of Gondor that 'originally the difference between correct Sindarin ae and ai was neglected, ai more usual in English being used for both in the general narrative.... So Hithaiglir on the map for Hithaeglir and Aiglos [for Aeglos]' (Vinyar Tengwar 42 (July 2001), p. 11).

The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion, by Wayne G Hammond and Christina Scull, Book 2, Ch 2, The Council of Elrond

Contributors:
Anglachel 29Apr03
~Nessime 11Mar04
Elena Tiriel 17Sep07

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