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Discussing: World War I Poets Challenge

World War I Poets Challenge

Here you go. Feel free to discuss the "WWI Poets Challenge" here. Marta

 

 

World War I Poets Challenge

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Re: Siegfried Sassoon - the nuzgul screams for Forodwaith

Hmm, very interesting! (I was thinking of "Attack", with the lines And hope, with furtive eyes and grappling fists, Flounders in mud...) Must ponder further. I'm glad this one has a long deadline ; it gives me a chance to let story ideas "mulch" in my head, as Altariel puts it.

 

 

Re: World War I Poets Challenge

Well, here's my entry. You are evil, Blue Iris, as I've said elsewhere.

 

 

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Re: World War I Poets Challenge

Then there was the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic hitting an already weakened population. That pandemic was aided in its pandemicness (I know, I know, not a word) because of the war. It's what killed the author of 'In Flanders Field'. All that troop movement between continents fueled the flames of that influenza.

 

 

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Re: World War I Poets Challenge

Blue Iris - that is just too sad. the poem is below for anybody interested. regarding spread of disease - how about I write a fourth age fic in which some explorer from way way east of Rhun (I'll call him Magellan or Coronado or something) discovers middle-earth, gives everybody measles and the indigenous populations die out? never mind. won't do that. Disease vectors in Middle Earth? You mean like sneezing and coughing and rats? I dunno, M-E is a land in a bubble. It doesn't change very much. It counts its history in thousands, not millions of years. Athelas seems to be pretty much good for whatever ails one, if one is lucky enough to have an Heir to throne of Arnor and Gondor around. The rest of us have to keep betadine and penicillin in our gunny sacks. IS there anything in the history of M-E akin to the Black Plague or a deadly Influenza? Polio? Syphilis? Anybody know? Lindorien Thanks to Bartleby - poem here for everybody's reference: Not to Keep By Robert Frost THEY sent him back to her. The letter came Saying … and she could have him. And before She could be sure there was no hidden ill Under the formal writing, he was in her sight— Living.—They gave him back to her alive— 5 How else? They are not known to send the dead— And not disfigured visibly. His face?— His hands? She had to look—to ask, “What was it, dear?” And she had given all And still she had all—they had—they the lucky! 10 Was n’t she glad now? Everything seemed won, And all the rest for them permissible ease. She had to ask, “What was it, dear?” “Enough, Yet not enough. A bullet through and through, 15 High in the breast. Nothing but what good care And medicine and rest—and you a week, Can cure me of to go again.” The same Grim giving to do over for them both. She dared no more than ask him with her eyes 20 How was it with him for a second trial. And with his eyes he asked her not to ask. They had given him back to her, but not to keep.

 

 

Re: World War I Poets Challenge

Poking out of exam prepping: IS there anything in the history of M-E akin to the Black Plague or a deadly Influenza? Polio? Syphilis? Anybody know? Well, there's this quote from Appendix A, "Gondor and the Heirs of Anarion":
The second and greatest evil came upon Gondor in the reign of Telemnar, the twenty-sixth king, whose father Minardil, son of Eldacar, was slain at Pelargir by the Corsairs of Umbar. (They were led by Angamaitë and Sangahyando, the great-grandsons of Castamir.) Soon after a deadly plague came with dark winds out of the East. The King and all his children died, and great numbers of the people of Gondor, especially those that lived in Osgiliath. Then for weariness and fewness of men the watch on the borders of Mordor ceased and the fortresses that guarded the passes were unmanned.
HTH, Marta

 

 

Re: World War I Poets Challenge

M'dear, shall we next traipse to post WWI Paris and play with the Lost Generation; Hemingway, Fitzgerald, et al? If so, I must bow out of that challenge. Although I have grown sympathetic to "The Great Gatsby", the very thought of Maria and Catherine are sufficient to make me want to gag. However, grimmer sounds like a place I would go. And the disease vectors analysis is interesting. It could be a fun thing to explore, if one is in the mood for faceless enemies. Mmm... "The Plague"... feeling the urge to go read that again...

 

 

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Re: Poetry for the challenge

Thank you so much, Blue Iris. You have no idea how much I appreciate all of this. I was born in South America, and because we were not so directly involved with the wars, we do not get exposed to all this legacy of words and feelings. Thanks for the wonderful challenge idea, for the useful and comprehensive links, and to all those who have contributed to the challenge. The pieces have all been beautiful. Starlight

 

 

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Re: World War I Poets Challenge

Oh dear. Lindorien, I blame you for this :-) Just what I need, another distraction! Denethor is is now talking in my head, in Housman's voice.

 

 

Re: World War I Poets Challenge

Denethor and Housman? Now *that* promises to be interesting!

 

 

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OK, the Denethor-Housman thing is done and posted. Very depressing to write, and I suspect more than a little over-dramatic. Still, here it is: Repose Earned, Words Unspoken Feel free to tear the balsted thing apart. cheers, Maya

 

 

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Re: World War I Poets Challenge

B.Iris, I appreciate the kind words. Still, can't help thinking it could stand to lose some bloat. Any ideas? cheers, Maya

 

 

Re: World War I Poets Challenge

I'm a little bit confused. Does the poem need to be written by someone who fought in World War I? I ask because I've written a story based on a poem by Yeats, and I'd like to enter it. In the anthology I have, the editor gives these comments on the poem: "Major Robert Gregory was the son of Lady Augusta Gregory, Yeats's friend and co-founder of the Abbey Theatre. He was killed in early 1918" (William Harmon, The Top 500 Poems). An Irish Airman Foresees His Death I know that I shall meet my fate Somewhere among the clouds above; Those that I fight I do not hate, Those that I guard I do not love; My country is Kiltartan Cross, My countrymen Kiltartan's poor, No likely end could bring them loss Or leave them happier than before. Nor law, nor duty bade me fight, Nor public men, nor cheering crowds, A lonely impulse of delight Drove to this tumult in the clouds; I balanced all, brought all to mind, The years to come seemed waste of breath, A waste of breath the years behind In balance with this life, this death. - William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), from The Wild Swans at Coole, 1919 (How in the world can this story belong in Middle Earth, you ask? "A Mumak-Rider of Harad Foresees His Death." Why not?) -Waltraute

 

 

Re: World War I Poets Challenge

Waltraute, Good question! I've e-mailed the challenge originator to let her know a question has arisen. Hopefully you'll have an answer very soon. The poem is marvellously suggestive, though, so even if it doesn't go into this challenge, it seems like it would make a great basis for a fanfic. :-D

 

 

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Re: World War I Poets Challenge

I've just realised that I might have something that fits this challenge. However, it's a poem based on a WW1 poem. Is that okay, or does it have to be a story?

 

 

Re: World War I Poets Challenge

Hmm. I have an idea based on a World War II poem - could I do that? Jay

 

 

Re: World War I Poets Challenge

Posting on behalf of JunoMagic: Hi there! I was not sure where to send this, but as I was searching the internet for more World War I poems for the challenge for veterans' day, I happened onto a site that has a great anthology of those poems online. I thought perhaps someone else needs the reference: http://www.firstworldwar.com/poetsandprose/mia_intro.htm And I would love more poetry related challenges. Yours sincerely Juno Have fun!

 

 

Re: World War I Poets Challenge

Jay, Hm.... I suppose it's close enough. Let's keep the poems to those two wars, though. Heads up, though, on the approaching deadline! Just a week more... Dwim

 

 

Re: World War I Poets Challenge

Elvenesse, Yes, a poem is fine. Sorry about the delay in answering! Dwim

 

 

Re: World War I Poets Challenge

Thanks, and I know that most of the admins are busy at the moment.

 

 

Re: World War I Poets Challenge

I've added my story for the challenge - just in time for the deadline. It's a little different, I think - an eagle reminisces about the Battle of Five Armies. It's based on a WWII poem, 'High Flight' by John Gillespie Magee - Dwim said it was OK! High Flight Jay

 

 

Re: World War I Poets Challenge

I posted my story a while back but never got round to SSPing it here before. My entry is At the going down of the sun inspired by Laurence Binyon's "For the Fallen". I also want to SSP a slightly different challenge - those of you who liked this one may also enjoy the Rah, Rah - Goooooo Fight! challenge to "write, filk or pay homage to a song that celebrates war or warriors. Any format, any length as long it includes, or is, a song." Cheers, Liz

 

 

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