Forum: Research Questions

Discussing: Ageing of Faramir

Ageing of Faramir

Yep, me again. So the Numenorean blood slows the aging process somewhat, yes? So at, say, 60 , how old would Faramir look? A well-preserved 45? Somewhat closer to his actual age? "Ageing" looks weird, and I am too tired to check out a dictionary.

 

 

Re: Ageing of Faramir

So the Numenorean blood slows the aging process somewhat, yes? So at, say, 60 , how old would Faramir look? A well-preserved 45? He lived to be 120. So, if Númenóreans aged at the same rate as modern men, he might appear *waves hand vaguely* about two-thirds his actual age. But Númenóreans, and by extension perhaps also the Dúnedain, apparently stayed fairly well-preserved until just the last few years of their lives*, then started failing rapidly ("rapidly" meaning at the same rate as shorter-lived mortal men), so you might be able to go with less than two-thirds. So, at age sixty, Faramir might look anywhere between 30 and 45, say... which should give you plenty of leaveway for your authorial instincts... - Barbara * Source: Unfinished Tales, Part 2, Ch 3, The Line of Elros, Kings of Númenor: Notes, Note 1

 

 

Re: Ageing of Faramir

I think Aragorn lived to be well over 200 years old, so dying at 120 is pretty early, I would think. I do remember reading somewhere that the visible and mental degeneration of Numenoreans actually happened quite quickly towards the end. They basically "decided" they wanted to die and did. Was that in UT as well, or am I imagining things?

 

 

Re: Ageing of Faramir

I think Aragorn lived to be well over 200 years old, so dying at 120 is pretty early, I would think. I believe that Aragorn's lifespan was exceptional for the Dúnedain of his time, whereas Faramir's was more normal. But Aragorn was of the direct Line of Elros, and they had longer lifespans than even other Númenóreans -- although apparently Tolkien kept reducing the differential between Elros' line and the rest of the lot in later writings. I do remember reading somewhere that the visible and mental degeneration of Numenoreans actually happened quite quickly towards the end. They basically "decided" they wanted to die and did. Was that in UT as well, or am I imagining things? Yes, in the same footnote it says: "Thus (as the Eldar) [the Númenóreans] grew at much the same rate as other Men, but when they had achieved "full-growth" they then aged, or "wore out," very much more slowly. The first approach of "world-weariness" was indeed for them a sign that their period of vigour was nearing its end. When it came to an end, if they persisted in living, then decay would proceed, as growth had done, no more slowly than among other Men. Thus a Númenórean would pass quickly, in ten years maybe, from health and vigour of mind to decrepitude and senility. In the earlier generations they did not "cling to life," but resigned it voluntarily. "Clinging to life," and so in the end dying perforce and involuntarily, was one of the changes brought about by the Shadow and the rebellion of the Númenóreans; it was also accompanied by a shrinking of their natural life-span." Unfinished Tales, Part 2, Ch 3, The Line of Elros, Kings of Númenor: Notes, Note 1 - Barbara

 

 

Re: Ageing of Faramir

"Ageing" looks weird, and I am too tired to check out a dictionary. P.S. I meant to add that my dictionary (to my surprise) listed both spellings, "ageing" and "aging"; but I have to say that if I saw "aging", my first thought would be that it was pronounced with a hard "g" (like egg), so I probably wouldn't recognize it immediately. Anyway, "ageing" is the spelling that I grew up with... but I admit that "rageing" would look weird to me. Ah, the joys of English... - Barbara

 

 

Re: Ageing of Faramir

So, at age sixty, Faramir might look anywhere between 30 and 45, say... which should give you plenty of leaveway for your authorial instincts... Just what I wanted to hear! Thanks ever so! Now if I can just get a hour or two free to get this sucker down on paper.....it's starting to itch my head. P.S. I meant to add that my dictionary (to my surprise) listed both spellings, "ageing" and "aging"; but I have to say that if I saw "aging", my first thought would be that it was pronounced with a hard "g" (like egg), so I probably wouldn't recognize it immediately Ah, don't you love it when the dictionary says, 'Oh, either's fine, and here's a third possible spelling"? After a certain tiredness level, a) many, many words look weird, and b) I just can't care enough to look em up. But I still care enough to point out that "I am aware that word is possibly incorrect". Thanks for taking the time to look it up !

 

 

Re: Ageing of Faramir

I believe that Aragorn's lifespan was exceptional for the Dúnedain of his time, whereas Faramir's was more normal. But Aragorn was of the direct Line of Elros, and they had longer lifespans than even other Númenóreans -- although apparently Tolkien kept reducing the differential between Elros' line and the rest of the lot in later writings. Most certainly. After all, leaving aside the biological difficulties of cross-species mating in the first place, the bloodline is diluted further and further with each successive generation. Aragorn really only has a very small trace of Elros' blood in him after however many generations. I imagine Eldarion puts a bit of a boost back in things for a while, though. But even leaving that aside, you also have to consider who Faramir falls in love with and marries. Eomer, I know, lives into his ninties and I figure Eowyn does much the same. But even so, it means she dies a good thirty years before Faramir. He's gotta miss her terribly after that (okay, okay, I'm a hopeless romantic, I'll admit it). Giving Finduilas' propensity for "pining for the fjiords," I figure something similar might have begun to happen with Faramir following Eowyn's death. Am I remembering some reference to Faramir getting to choose when to go the same way Aragorn does? Or is it wishful thinking on my part? Berz.

 

 

Re: Ageing of Faramir

He's gotta miss her terribly after that (okay, okay, I'm a hopeless romantic, I'll admit it). Giving Finduilas' propensity for "pining for the fjiords," I figure something similar might have begun to happen with Faramir following Eowyn's death. Me too. Screw logic! Plus, Denethor still had lots of mileage left in him at 89. As for Faramir "choosing," I don't think that was ever stated in the texts, but I could be wrong.

 

 

Re: Ageing of Faramir

Denethor was prematurely worn and aged by all those palantir-wrestling bouts with Sauron. He might well have looked younger and stronger if he hadn't spent so much time locking minds with ol' Red-Eye. I don't think of Faramir as the type who would fade away from grief over Eowyn. He would be devastated by her loss, but he would have children, grandchildren, and a lot more to do; and a generally hopeful environment around him, and no Shadow to the East. RAKSHA THE DEMON

 

 

Re: Ageing of Faramir

ol' Red-Eye.

 

 

In Forums

Discussion Info

Intended for: General Audience

This forum is open to all HASA members. It is read-only for the general public.

Membership on HASA is free and it takes only a few minutes to join. If you would like to participate, please click here.

If you are already a member, please log in to participate.

« Back to Research Questions

Stories linked to the forum