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Discussing: Old English translation...

Old English translation...

Since I'm assuming that one indicates Rohirric with Old English (at least, I've seen it in fanfiction), how would one say The unlucky man's horse dies, the lucky man's wife dies. [Shocked by it? Don't be. It's a Bengali (Indian) proverb which I've adapted (replacing 'ox' with 'horse') for one of the Rohirrim to say in a pub.] Cheers, Noldo.

 

 

Re: Old English translation...

Since I'm assuming that one indicates Rohirric with Old English (at least, I've seen it in fanfiction), how would one say The unlucky man's horse dies, the lucky man's wife dies. [Shocked by it? Don't be. It's a Bengali (Indian) proverb which I've adapted (replacing 'ox' with 'horse') for one of the Rohirrim to say in a pub.] Cheers, Noldo. That is so funny. I can't help you with the Old English, but if you ever need a Latin translation, I could possibly help you, although if you need something like a novel translated, I could not.

 

 

Re: Old English translation...

The unlucky man's horse dies, the lucky man's wife dies. Okay, near as I can tell, lucky isn't a word of Germanic origin and did not exist in Old English, but there are, of course, words that convey that same concept. Here's the best I could come up with: Blessede beon not se man hwas horse deyen, blessede beon se man hwas wif deyen. Karri

 

 

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